Flashlights

Good Brands:
http://www.klaruslight.com
http://www.zebralight.com/
http://www.eagletac.com
jetbeamusa.com
fenixlight.com
surefire
47s Quark and Preon
http://hdssystems.com/
http://www.sunwayman-usa.com
http://www.nitecore.com
http://www.spark001.com
http://www.thrunite.com
http://www.blackshadow.co


From left to right: CR123A; Sunwayman M11R, V11R, M10R; JetBeam PC10; Thrunite Neutron 1C; Zebralight SC30; 4Sevens Mini 123.

Batteries of Interest:
RCR123 or 16340 = CR123 rechargable
18650 = 2xCR123 good brands are AW, Tenergy, Ultrafire
10440 = AAA lithium rechargeable
14500 = AA lithium rechargeable

Sanyo Eneloop (debadged Duracell)

Chargers
Pila IBC charger
Maha

 

related post

https://wacki.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/lighting/
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?343332-What-type-of-light-do-I-need-for-walking-trails-at-night&highlight=cr123

Cool vs. Neutral white:

When most people talk about their warm tints, they actually mean neutral according to the manufacturer (around 4000-4500K CCT). We just call them warm by habit because they’re warmer than the cool tints. There are even warmer tints as well, though IMO those go too far in the other direction.

Your typical white LED is actually a blue LED covered in yellow-green phosphor. It has gaps in the colour spectrum it emits and an uneven distribution overall. This causes colours to appear unnatural under the light and makes it more difficult to distinguish boundaries and colours than it would be under sunlight.

For cool white there’s a gigantic spike at blue, a gap at cyan, and then a spike at yellow-green with a rapid falloff to a gap towards red. Neutral white slops on more phosphor to convert more of the blue, which reduces efficiency but gives better red coverage.

Reds and browns are very common in nature so the colour distribution of warmer tints can be more useful than getting fractionally more lumens from using a cool tint. Especially outdoors.
Increasing red light and reducing blue also has the added benefit of cutting through fog and smoke better, since blue tends to scatter easily.

There’s a thread dedicated to analyzing the spectral distribution of all kinds of things here:

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